Microsoft has built an online dashboard of privacy controls in an attempt to soothe lingering anger over Windows 10 and its ability to phone home people’s private information.

The new web portal lists some of the personal data that is collected from PCs and devices and sent back to Redmond, and allows people to somewhat limit the snooping. Meanwhile, Microsoft will also tweak Windows 10’s built-in privacy controls, giving Home and Pro users a choice between some system surveillance or full-blown system surveillance.

It’s the software giant’s way of dampening last year’s outcry over its silent slurping of telemetry data from people’s machines.

“We are continuing this commitment to make it as easy as possible for you to make informed choices about your privacy with Windows 10,” writes Terry Myerson, executive veep of Microsoft’s Windows and Devices group. “With that in mind, in the Creators Update, we are making some changes by simplifying the privacy settings themselves and improving the way we present the privacy settings to you.”

The dashboard, which went live on Tuesday, reveals how Microsoft logs people’s whereabouts as well as their search requests, Cortana chats, and browser histories pulled from their Windows 10 computers and gadgets. This data can be deleted on request via the portal. According to Microsoft:

When you are signed in with your Microsoft account, you can go to account.microsoft.com/privacy to review and clear data such as browsing history, search history, location activity, and Cortana’s Notebook – all in one place. This is our first step in expanding the tools that give you visibility and control over your data spanning Microsoft products and services, and we will continue to add more functionality and categories of data over time.

For those running the Windows 10 Insider builds, Microsoft will soon roll out, in an upcoming update, simplified categories for the telemetry settings: basically it’s on or almost off, depending on your edition of Windows 10. This change is due to be pushed out to the general public in the Windows 10 Creators Update slated for the spring.

Read more: The Register